Category archives for “San Francisco”

Governor Brown Signs Three New Alcoholic Beverage Laws

October 03, 2016

On Wednesday, September 28, 2016, Governor Brown signed three alcohol-related bills into law, creating new on-sale restaurant licenses for San Francisco, legalizing the glass of bubbly you have with your haircut and criminalizing powdered alcohol. All three laws become effective on January 1, 2017.

SB 1285 - 5 New Restricted Restaurant Licenses for San Francisco

Senate Bill 1285 (“SB 1285”) adds Section 23826.13 to the California Business and Professions Code, which authorizes the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (“ABC”) to allocate 5 new “neighborhood-restricted special on-sale general” licenses in San Francisco. The 5 new licenses are subject to most of the same privileges and restrictions – and the same original fee of $13,800 – as an on-sale general license for a bona-fide eating place (Type 47). However, these 5 licenses differ from regular Type 47 licenses in that they are neighborhood-specific, are nontransferable, and when surrendered, revert back to the ABC for issuance to a new applicant. This means that licenses will only be available, and must remain in, the eligible neighborhoods – Bayview’s Third Street, outer Mission Street in the Excelsior, San Bruno Avenue, Ocean Avenue, Noriega Street, Taraval Street and Visitacion Valley. Licenses in the most popular restaurant hubs remain available only by purchasing an existing license, market values of which often run several hundred thousand dollars. The new licenses also do not permit the exercise of off-sale privileges, like a Type 47 does.

In order to be eligible to apply for a license, SB 1285 requires a pre-application meeting, which must be conducted and verified by a local government body. This requirement includes notifying nearby residents, conducting a community meeting, outreach to certain neighborhood associations and to the San Francisco Chief of Police. The ABC will establish a priority application period in accordance with Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 23961, and if more than 5 applications are received, they will hold a lottery for eligible applicants.

AB 1322 - Beauty Salons and Barber Shops

Assembly Bill 1322 (“AB 1322”) permits beauty salons and barber shops to serve wine and beer without a license provided there is no extra charge for the service. The service can only be offered during business hours and no later than 10:00 p.m., and the amount of beer and wine cannot exceed 12 ounces and 6 ounces per customer, respectively. Further, the salon or barber shop providing the service must be in good standing with the State Board of Barbering and Cosmetology. Prior to AB 1322, the exception allowing unlicensed service of alcohol by a business to its customers only existed for limousines and hot air balloon ride services. (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 23399.5)

AB 1554 - Ban on Powdered Alcohol

Assembly Bill 1554 makes it a crime to purchase or possess powered alcohol. The bill defines powdered alcohol as “an alcohol prepared or sold in a powder or crystalline form that is used for human consumption in that form or reconstituted as an alcoholic beverage when mixed with water or any other liquid.” The definition makes clear that vaporized alcohol (which is already illegal in California) is not powdered alcohol. The bill also prohibits the manufacture, distribution and sale of powered alcohol. An individual caught making, selling or using powered alcohol is guilty of an infraction and must pay a $125 fine. (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code §§ 23794 and 25623)

For more information about the recent changes to California’s alcohol laws, contact an attorney at Strike & Techel.


California Brewpub Licenses: What You Need to Know

October 08, 2015

Craft beer continues to be all the rage in California and across the country. With the increase in demand for local craft beers, we’ve been getting a lot of questions about how to get licensed as a brewery in California. The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (“ABC”) issues three primary license types that permit beer production, including Beer Manufacturer licenses (Type 1), Small Beer Manufacturer licenses (Type 23) and the increasingly popular On-Sale General Brewpub license (Type 75). The license privileges of each type of brewery license vary, and the brewpub license is a good choice for brewers that primarily want to operate a brewpub or microbrewery restaurant rather than sell their beers for consumers to drink off the brewery’s premises.

A Type 75 brewpub license authorizes the sale of beer, wine and distilled spirits for consumption at a bona fide eating place, which essentially requires that the facility be a restaurant with its own kitchen that serves meals. The ability to sell distilled spirits as a brewpub is a privilege that many find attractive in deciding between brewery licenses. Type 1 and Type 23 breweries may, but are not required to, operate bona fide eating places, but they are limited to beer and wine, and cannot sell distilled spirits. Additionally, beer, wine, and distilled spirits restaurant licenses (i.e., Type 47 On-Sale General for Bona Fide Public Eating Place) are often extremely expensive as the number of licenses issued is limited per county based on population. There is no cap on the number of Type 75 licenses that can be issued, so the Type 75 license can be an attractive option for businesses that want to sell distilled spirits, although all Type 75 licensees must meet certain brewing requirements.

Brewpubs must produce at least 100 barrels of beer per year and can produce no more than 5,000 barrels of beer per year. That production cap is substantially lower than the production allowances for Small Beer Manufacturers (less than 60,000 barrels per year) and Beer Manufacturers (60,000 barrels per year or more). Additionally, a Type 75 brewpub premises must have brewing equipment that has at least seven-barrel brewing capacity. The ABC has recently been looking into the brewing equipment of Type 75 licensees and enforcing against brewpubs that aren’t actually brewing beer or don’t have the requisite brewing capacity.

Other key features of Type 75 brewpub licenses include the following:

• Cannot make sales from the brewpub premises for off-premises consumption. This means that a brewpub cannot sell bottles, cans, growlers or other containers for consumption away from the brewpub.

• Can sell beer produced by the brewpub to California licensed wholesalers.

• Must buy all wine, distilled spirits, and beer not produced by the brewpub from a licensed wholesaler or winegrower. Note that brewpubs cannot buy or sell beer or other alcoholic beverages from other brewpubs or retailers.

The initial fee for a brewpub license is currently $12,000, which is more expensive than most California license types. The annual fee is determined by the population where the brewpub is located, and varies between approximately $500 and $1,000 per year. Additionally, local rules where the brewpub is located may require additional permitting or other approvals before the brewpub can operate. Lastly, all breweries, including brewpubs, must obtain a brewery basic permit from the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade bureau, the federal agency that regulates alcoholic beverages. There is no fee for the federal permit, but a bond is required.

Contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have any questions about starting a brewery!


Strike & Techel is hiring!

March 27, 2015

Strike & Techel LLP, a law firm specializing in alcoholic beverage law, is seeking an associate attorney with 2-5 years of law firm experience and enthusiasm for the alcoholic beverage field. The firm represents a broad range of clients, including producers (wineries, breweries and distilleries), importers, retailers, advertising/promotional agencies, and other related beverage industry businesses. S&T provides comprehensive counsel on a variety of topics relevant to our clients. We handle alcohol-specific matters such as regulatory compliance, dealings with state and federal alcohol agencies, and alcohol licensing, as well as general legal matters such as trademark registrations, contract drafting and review, purchase and sale transactions, etc. For more information about the firm, visit www.strikeandtechel.com.

Alcohol beverage law experience is highly desirable but not mandatory. The selected attorney will be responsible primarily for corporate matters and alcohol licensing projects. Strong corporate/transactional skills are essential, and familiarity with entity structuring and operating agreements/bylaws, commercial leases, and conditional use permits is preferred. The ideal applicant will have strong analytical, writing and communication skills, an engaging personality and a sense of humor.

If you think that you’d be a great fit with us, please send us your resume, a short sample blog post (modeled on the ones on our website) about a current alcoholic beverage issue that has caught your attention, a cover letter, references and salary requirements. In the cover letter, please tell us why you chose the issue in your sample blog post and why you are interested in alcoholic beverage law. We
will be accepting resumes through the end of April at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


San Francisco ABC Office Temporarily Moving in January

January 03, 2012

The San Francisco ABC office will be moving to Oakland this month to allow for remodeling efforts at the San Francisco office. The current San Francisco office, located at 71 Stevenson St. will be closed beginning at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 20, 2012. They will re-open at their temporary Oakland location on Monday, January 23, 2012. The temporary office contact information is:

Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control

1515 Clay Street, Suite 2208

Oakland, CA 94612

(510) 622-4970

Be sure to update your records and plan accordingly if you need to contact the San Francisco ABC office. It is anticipated that the office will move back into San Francisco in March 2012, but construction delays may extend the moving date. We will keep you posted as new information arises.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2012 · All Rights Reserved ·


San Francisco Board of Supervisors Approve Alcohol Fee

September 22, 2010

On Tuesday, September 21st, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved a controversial fee on alcohol that would take effect January 1st, 2011. Within hours, Mayor Gavin Newsom vetoed the plan. The question remains whether the board has the necessary eight votes to overcome his veto.

Proponents believe the $16 million in revenue the fee will generate is necessary to offset the cost of services such as ambulance rides, hospital visits and alcohol abuse centers/programs for alcoholics. They say the fee would only result in a small increase in costs for local consumers and business owners.

Opponents argue the fee is an additional tax on businesses struggling in a weak economy, who already have to pay San Francisco specific employment and health care taxes. They also argue the fee is an illegal tax and violates state law.

We are waiting to see what the Board of Supervisors does next. Avalos has implied the fee might be appropriate for a public vote if he is unable to secure the necessary votes from the Board. However, past history has shown Californians are not receptive of an increase in taxes on alcohol. For example, a statewide initiative proposed earlier this year for a sizeable increase on the tax to alcohol was not able to obtain the signatures necessary to qualify for the ballot (Initiative 1461).

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice.


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