Category archives for “California”

Governor Brown on a Hot Streak, Signs Three New Alcoholic Beverage Laws

October 03, 2016

On Wednesday, September 28, 2016, Governor Brown signed three alcohol-related bills into law, creating new on-sale restaurant licenses for San Francisco, legalizing the glass of bubbly you have with your haircut and criminalizing powdered alcohol. All three laws become effective on January 1, 2017.

SB 1285 - 5 New Restricted Restaurant Licenses for San Francisco

Senate Bill 1285 (“SB 1285”) adds Section 23826.13 to the California Business and Professions Code, which authorizes the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (“ABC”) to allocate 5 new “neighborhood-restricted special on-sale general” licenses in San Francisco. The 5 new licenses are subject to most of the same privileges and restrictions – and the same original fee of $13,800 – as an on-sale general license for a bona-fide eating place (Type 47). However, these 5 licenses differ from regular Type 47 licenses in that they are neighborhood-specific, are nontransferable, and when surrendered, revert back to the ABC for issuance to a new applicant. This means that licenses will only be available, and must remain in, the eligible neighborhoods – Bayview’s Third Street, outer Mission Street in the Excelsior, San Bruno Avenue, Ocean Avenue, Noriega Street, Taraval Street and Visitacion Valley. Licenses in the most popular restaurant hubs remain available only by purchasing an existing license, market values of which often run several hundred thousand dollars. The new licenses also do not permit the exercise of off-sale privileges, like a Type 47 does.

In order to be eligible to apply for a license, SB 1285 requires a pre-application meeting, which must be conducted and verified by a local government body. This requirement includes notifying nearby residents, conducting a community meeting, outreach to certain neighborhood associations and to the San Francisco Chief of Police. The ABC will establish a priority application period in accordance with Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 23961, and if more than 5 applications are received, they will hold a lottery for eligible applicants.

AB 1322 - Beauty Salons and Barber Shops

Assembly Bill 1322 (“AB 1322”) permits beauty salons and barber shops to serve wine and beer without a license provided there is no extra charge for the service. The service can only be offered during business hours and no later than 10:00 p.m., and the amount of beer and wine cannot exceed 12 ounces and 6 ounces per customer, respectively. Further, the salon or barber shop providing the service must be in good standing with the State Board of Barbering and Cosmetology. Prior to AB 1322, the exception allowing unlicensed service of alcohol by a business to its customers only existed for limousines and hot air balloon ride services. (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 23399.5)

AB 1554 - Ban on Powdered Alcohol

Assembly Bill 1554 makes it a crime to purchase or possess powered alcohol. The bill defines powdered alcohol as “an alcohol prepared or sold in a powder or crystalline form that is used for human consumption in that form or reconstituted as an alcoholic beverage when mixed with water or any other liquid.” The definition makes clear that vaporized alcohol (which is already illegal in California) is not powdered alcohol. The bill also prohibits the manufacture, distribution and sale of powered alcohol. An individual caught making, selling or using powered alcohol is guilty of an infraction and must pay a $125 fine. (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code §§ 23794 and 25623)

For more information about the recent changes to California’s alcohol laws, contact an attorney at Strike & Techel.


Class Action Dismissed in Arsenic in Wine Claim

March 28, 2016

Just over a year ago, a class action was filed in California against a group of six winery defendants, producing 83 named wine brands, alleging that the wines contained unsafe levels of arsenic (Charles et al. vs. The Wine Group, Inc., et al, No. BC576061). The case triggered numerous articles about wine potentially being unsafe for consumption. On March 23, 2016, the Los Angeles Superior Court sustained a demurrer by the wineries defending the claim, and dismissed the action. The plaintiffs did not allege actual harm from exposure to arsenic; rather, they asserted that the non-disclosure of trace arsenic constituted a breach of California’s “Prop 65” labeling and consumer notification requirements. The court disagreed. All claims against the wineries were dismissed.

Due to its presence in soil and ground water, virtually all food and beverages contain trace elements of arsenic. There is no US regulation setting a maximum quantity of arsenic that may be present in either food or wine, although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does have a limit for inorganic arsenic in drinking water, at 0.01mg per liter. Other countries regulate arsenic levels in wine. For example, the European Union adopted a maximum of 0.2mg per liter, a standard set by the International Organization of Vine and Wine (OIV). In Canada, there is a maximum limit of 0.1mg/liter of wine. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO), one of the world’s largest wine purchasers, conducts regular testing of wines from all over the world, including some of the wines identified in the lawsuit, and all were below the regulatory limit for arsenic.

Shortly after the original claim was filed in this matter, UC Davis published a very helpful factsheet about arsenic contamination, which can be found HERE for more information.

Around the time of the original California state case, nearly identical arsenic lawsuits were also filed in federal courts in Louisiana, Florida, and Puerto Rico, with a long list of additional defendants. Those lawsuits were each dismissed without prejudice, and are not affected by the decision in California. The California plaintiffs have said they plan to continue to pursue their case, indicating that an appeal may be forthcoming.

For more information about the case, or about California wine labeling generally, contact an attorney at Strike & Techel.


(Un)Happy Hour Regulations

February 10, 2016

Several states restrict or ban happy hour promotions, and many people assume that these restrictions are a remnant of Prohibition. However, the practice of “happy hour”—gathering before dinner for cocktails, wine, or beer—did not actually arise until during Prohibition. Because the sale of alcohol was illegal, drinking was a surreptitious activity performed in the privacy of homes or speakeasies. Thus, enthusiastic imbibers would gather in private for a couple of drinks prior to heading out to a public establishment for dinner, where alcohol would not be served. Following the repeal of Prohibition, happy hour specials were popular at restaurants and bars across the nation. However, the 1980s brought an increased focus on preventing drunk driving, which spurred changes to alcohol laws. In 1984, President Reagan signed a bill encouraging the nationwide adoption of 21 as the minimum drinking age, and states that refused to raise the legal drinking age to 21 lost substantial federal highway funds. Also, during this time, several states and municipalities passed laws banning happy hours in an attempt to reduce excessive consumption and drunk driving.

Happy hour regulations can take many forms. Examples of happy hour promotion types that are frequently prohibited or restricted include:

  • Unlimited Drinks — Many states, including New York, prohibit on-premise licensees from offering unlimited drinks for a single price. See N.Y. Alc. Bev. Cont. Law § 117-a.
  • Specials Lasting Only a Portion of the Day —North Carolina is one of several states that disallow on-premises licensees from offering a reduced price drink for only a portion of the day, such as between 4-6pm. See 14B N.C. Admin. Code 15B .0223.
  • Specials Only Available to a Segment of the Population — North Carolina also prohibits drink specials that are only offered to a segment of the population, such as a “Ladies’ Night” special. 14B N.C. Admin. Code 15B .0223. California also prohibits businesses from offering discriminatory price specials, such as specials that are based on a patron’s sex. Cal. Civ. Code § 51.
  • “Two-for-One” or Multiple Drink Specials — Several states, including Virginia, prohibit retail licensees from selling multiple drinks for a single price, such as a “two-for-one” special. See 3 Va. Admin. Code § 5-50-160.
  • Stacking – Massachusetts and Hawaii do not permit retail licensees to deliver more than two drinks to one person at one time, while Connecticut prohibits the delivery of more than one drink to any one person at one time. 204 Mass. Code Regs. 4.03; Honolulu Liquor Comm’n, Rule 3-84-78.52; Conn. Agencies Regs. § 30-6-A24b.
  • Temporal Restrictions — Ohio permits “happy hour” time periods, where drinks may be sold at a reduced price; however, no “happy hour” specials are permitted after 9pm. Ohio Admin. Code 4301:1-1-50.
  • Limit to Amount of Discount – Some states regulate the permissible amount of a discount for drinks for on-premises consumption, such as South Carolina which prohibits discounts greater than 50%, and Tennessee where drink discounts may not result in a price below the licensee’s cost. See S.C. Code Ann. § 61-4-160; Tenn. Code Ann. § 57-4-203.

Although many states have regulations prohibiting happy hour promotions, there have been some permissive changes in the past few years. In 2012, Kansas relaxed its laws regarding on-premises alcohol promotions, and drink specials that last only a portion of the day or apply only to a segment of the population are now permissible. In 2014, Virginia revised its happy hour laws slightly, allowing bars and restaurants to use the phrase “happy hour” via advertisements both on and off the licensed premises. In 2015, happy hour returned to Illinois, which now allows licensees to offer temporary drink specials for up to four hours per day, and not more than fifteen hours per week.

For advice regarding your state’s regulations governing happy hours and other alcohol promotions, contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.


New California Law Creates License for Craft Distilleries, Updates Spirits Tasting Rules

October 13, 2015

On October 8, 2015, California Governor Brown signed the Craft Distilleries Act of 2015 into law, which creates a new license for craft distilleries. AB 1295 is a step forward for craft spirits producers, who will no longer be subject to the same strict restrictions that apply to traditional Distilled Spirits Manufacturers (Type 4 licensees). The new Craft Distiller’s license allows the production of up to 100,000 gallons of distilled spirits each year and also includes several other key privileges not available to larger distilleries that hold Type 4 licenses: Craft Distillers will be able to sell distilled spirits to consumers, operate restaurants from their premises, and hold interests in on-sale retail licenses.

AB 1295 adds several sections to the California Alcoholic Beverage Control Act, including Business and Professions Code Sections 23500 through 23508. Those sections include the following privileges for Craft Distillers:

  • Manufacture of up to 100,000 gallons of distilled spirits each fiscal year (July 1 – June 30), excluding any brandy the licensee may have produced under a Brandy Manufacturer license. Licensees can also package, rectify, mix, flavor, color, label, and export distilled spirits manufactured by the licensee.
  • Sale of up to 2.25 liters of its distilled spirits per consumer, per day, in conjunction with instructional tastings held on its licensed premises.
  • Operation of a bona fide eating place on its licensed premises or a location contiguous to its premises, from which the licensee may sell beer, wine, and distilled spirits.
  • May hold an interest in up to two California on-sale licenses, provided certain conditions are met.
  • Cannot be issued to anyone who manufactures or has manufactured for him over 100,000 gallons of distilled spirits, whether inside or outside California, excluding any brandy the licensee may have produced under a Brandy Manufacturer license.

The new bill also amends Business and Professions Code Section 23363.1 to allow Craft Distillers to conduct distilled spirits tastings either: a) off their licensed premises at a nonprofit event held under a nonprofit permit; or, b) at their licensed premises under specific conditions. The other notable change to the statute is that tastings can be provided in the form of a cocktail or mixed drink, and the sample size limitation has been changed to one and one-half ounces maximum per consumer per day. Those changes apply to both Craft Distillers and Distilled Spirits Manufacturers.

The new laws take effect January 1, 2016.

Contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have any questions about distillery licenses in California or elsewhere.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2015 • All Rights Reserved •


California Brewpub Licenses: What You Need to Know

October 08, 2015

Craft beer continues to be all the rage in California and across the country. With the increase in demand for local craft beers, we’ve been getting a lot of questions about how to get licensed as a brewery in California. The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (“ABC”) issues three primary license types that permit beer production, including Beer Manufacturer licenses (Type 1), Small Beer Manufacturer licenses (Type 23) and the increasingly popular On-Sale General Brewpub license (Type 75). The license privileges of each type of brewery license vary, and the brewpub license is a good choice for brewers that primarily want to operate a brewpub or microbrewery restaurant rather than sell their beers for consumers to drink off the brewery’s premises.

A Type 75 brewpub license authorizes the sale of beer, wine and distilled spirits for consumption at a bona fide eating place, which essentially requires that the facility be a restaurant with its own kitchen that serves meals. The ability to sell distilled spirits as a brewpub is a privilege that many find attractive in deciding between brewery licenses. Type 1 and Type 23 breweries may, but are not required to, operate bona fide eating places, but they are limited to beer and wine, and cannot sell distilled spirits. Additionally, beer, wine, and distilled spirits restaurant licenses (i.e., Type 47 On-Sale General for Bona Fide Public Eating Place) are often extremely expensive as the number of licenses issued is limited per county based on population. There is no cap on the number of Type 75 licenses that can be issued, so the Type 75 license can be an attractive option for businesses that want to sell distilled spirits, although all Type 75 licensees must meet certain brewing requirements.

Brewpubs must produce at least 100 barrels of beer per year and can produce no more than 5,000 barrels of beer per year. That production cap is substantially lower than the production allowances for Small Beer Manufacturers (less than 60,000 barrels per year) and Beer Manufacturers (60,000 barrels per year or more). Additionally, a Type 75 brewpub premises must have brewing equipment that has at least seven-barrel brewing capacity. The ABC has recently been looking into the brewing equipment of Type 75 licensees and enforcing against brewpubs that aren’t actually brewing beer or don’t have the requisite brewing capacity.

Other key features of Type 75 brewpub licenses include the following:

• Cannot make sales from the brewpub premises for off-premises consumption. This means that a brewpub cannot sell bottles, cans, growlers or other containers for consumption away from the brewpub.

• Can sell beer produced by the brewpub to California licensed wholesalers.

• Must buy all wine, distilled spirits, and beer not produced by the brewpub from a licensed wholesaler or winegrower. Note that brewpubs cannot buy or sell beer or other alcoholic beverages from other brewpubs or retailers.

The initial fee for a brewpub license is currently $12,000, which is more expensive than most California license types. The annual fee is determined by the population where the brewpub is located, and varies between approximately $500 and $1,000 per year. Additionally, local rules where the brewpub is located may require additional permitting or other approvals before the brewpub can operate. Lastly, all breweries, including brewpubs, must obtain a brewery basic permit from the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade bureau, the federal agency that regulates alcoholic beverages. There is no fee for the federal permit, but a bond is required.

Contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have any questions about starting a brewery!


Comparing Apples and Pears

July 29, 2015

The cider and perry industry is booming. More and more producers are entering the market, and existing producers of other alcoholic beverages are expanding into cider and perry production. Although commonly associated with beer, cider and perry are actually considered wine under federal law, and can be interchangeably labeled as apple wine or cider, and pear wine or perry. Production of cider or perry requires a bonded winery permit from the Alcohol & Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (“TTB”). It must be made wholly from the alcoholic fermentation of sound, ripe apples, or sound ripe pears (the addition of sugar, water, or alcohol is permitted in specified quantities). The TTB recently updated its FAQs with a section on cider, which can be found HERE.

A cider or perry which is over 7% alcohol must be labeled in the same manner as wine, and a Certificate of Label Approval (“COLA”) must be obtained for the product from the TTB. If it is under 7%, the product is subject to Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) labeling rules, including a required nutritional statement (see our recent blog posts on FDA alcoholic beverage labeling HERE and HERE). If any flavoring materials are added, like honey, spices, or artificial flavors, the product requires formula approval, even if it is under 7%.

Each state has its own regulatory framework for cider and perry. For example, in California, a Type 2 Winegrower can make cider and perry, and a licensed Type 1 Beer Manufacturer may also produce cider and perry without any additional state license (although they still need the TTB bonded winery permit). In New York, Breweries, Farm Breweries, and Farm Wineries can make cider and other “pome fruit” wines, including perry (again with the TTB winery permit). Interestingly, in New York, a product marketed as a cider or perry, up to 8.5% alcohol, must be brand label registered, and is not eligible for the standard wine exemption from registration.

If you have any questions about producing cider or perry, please contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2015 • All Rights Reserved •


New California ABC Advisory on Merchandising Services by Suppliers

January 07, 2015

In December 2014, the California ABC posted a new Industry Advisory about merchandising services. Free services provided by suppliers to retail licensees, such as stocking shelves, pricing inventory, rotating stock, etc., are prohibited things-of-value under California Business & Professions Code sections 25500 and 25502. However, a number of permitted exceptions are separately provided for in Section 25503.2. The Advisory was posted in response to inquiries and complaints about the scope of permissible activity. When ABC receives multiple complaints about impermissible conduct, investigations and license accusations may well follow, so it would be prudent for suppliers to review the scope of permissible merchandising activities.

Permitted activity varies depending on the type of retailer and the products involved so we created a simple chart below to help keep it straight.

Note that in all cases, any merchandising activities can only be done with the retailer’s permission. In no case can a supplier move the inventory of another supplier, except for “incidental touching” to access the space allocated to the licensee providing the merchandising service.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2015 · All Rights Reserved ·


What is in the Bottle? Rules for California Appellations on Wine Labels

November 10, 2014

Appellations of origin are the place names that describe where the grapes that make up a given wine were grown. There are rules controlling the statement of appellation on the label, all of which are aimed at making sure that the label of the product accurately reflects what is inside the bottle. Most of the appellation labeling rules are in the Code of Federal Regulations at 27 CFR Part 4, but state law must also be considered, and can sometimes be more limiting than the federal rules.

Appellations are required on wines if the label also includes a varietal designation or a vintage year (27 CFR 4.34(b)). The chart below lists some of the basics on appellations for wines made from California grapes.

Federal Rules

Appellation on Label What is in the Bottle?
California 75% of the fruit must be from California and the wine must be finished within California or an adjoining state. (27 CFR 4.25)
A County in California 75% of the fruit has to be from the county and the wine has to be finished in California. (27 CFR 4.25)
Two or Three Counties in California All of the fruit has to come from the listed counties, the percentage of fruit from each county has to be listed on the label, and the wine has to be finished in California. No more than three counties can be listed. (27 CFR 4.25)
An American Viticultural Area (AVA) in California AVAs are specific geographic areas approved by the TTB. A list of all of the AVAs in the country is available here. 85% of the fruit has to come from the AVA and the wine has to be finished in California. (27 CFR 4.25)


Special California Requirements

Appellation on Label Special California Rule
“California” or any geographical subdivision of California (including a county or two or three counties) 100% of fruit must come from California. (Cal. Code Regs., tit. 17, § 17015). This rule is more specific than the federal rules, and means that any wine with a California appellation of any kind must be made from 100% California fruit.
“Sonoma County” Labels MUST say this if also labeled with an AVA entirely within Sonoma County. (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code 25246)
“Napa Valley” Labels MUST say this if also labeled with an AVA entirely within Napa County. (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code 25240)
“Lodi” Labels MUST say this if also labeled with an AVA entirely within the Lodi AVA (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code 25245)
“Paso Robles” Labels MUST say this if also labeled with an AVA entirely within the Paso Robles AVA (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code 25244)
“Napa”, “Sonoma” and any AVA in Napa County The rules for using “Napa,” “Sonoma,” and any AVAs in Napa are especially strict. Those terms cannot appear on the labels unless the wine in the bottle qualifies for use of the term under the federal labeling regulations.(Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code 25241, 25242 and 27 CFR 4.25)
Counties of Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, Lake, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Alameda, San Benito, Solano, San Luis Obispo, Contra Costa, Monterey or Marin Any written representation (e.g., labels, advertising, company letterhead, etc.) that a wine is produced entirely from grapes grown in these counties must be true. (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code 25237)
“California Central Coast Counties Dry Wine” This designation can only appear on a label if all of the grapes are from the counties of Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, Lake, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Alameda, San Benito, Solano San Luis Obispo, Contra Costa, Monterey or Marin. (Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code 25236)

Related Labeling Considerations

The appellation rules noted above are intertwined with other federal labeling regulations, which may also come into play. For example, if a label includes a varietal and an appellation, 75% of the grapes used in the wine must be of the stated grape type and all of those grapes must come from the stated appellation. (27 CFR 4.23) If the label includes a vintage year and an appellation, 85% of the grapes in the wine must be from the stated vintage year – and if the appellation is an AVA, the percentage requirement rises to 95%. (27 CFR 4.27)

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2014 · All Rights Reserved ·


Selling Alcohol to California Consumers Online

September 04, 2014

Traditionally a customer wanting a bottle of alcohol in California would go to their local package or grocery store to get it or, if they were lucky enough to be in wine country, directly to a winery. In recent years, with consumers actively experimenting and looking for more variety, and with the boom in online shopping generally, consumers have a lot more options to find that elusive boutique wine, craft beer or small batch spirit brand that they have heard about and have been looking for. All of this means that consumers are turning more and more to the internet to find the alcohol that they want to serve at home. A quick Google search of internet alcohol sales in California yields more than 10 million results.

SPIRITS: Only a California Type 21 off-sale general licensee can sell a bottle of distilled spirits direct to consumer (DTC). Although a distiller can host a customer at the distillery to taste the products that are made there, a distiller cannot sell a bottle of spirits to a customer to take home.

BEER: There is a bit more leeway for beer with brewers being able to offer tastings and sell beer to customers. The CA law was revised just this year to make it very clear that a brewer can only sell its own beer to customers, and not beer made by other brewers, unless it gets a retail license. As a matter of policy, the ABC will allow a beer manufacturer to also make an online sale of its beer to a consumer. An on-premises retailer like a restaurant or a bar can also sell beer to customers to take home, and by the same ABC policy can sell online. Off-sale retailers like grocery stores can sell beer to consumers online.

WINE: As with other alcohol, wine can be sold DTC by off-sale retailers. An on-sale retailer can also sell wine online, under ABC policy allowing online sales by retailers. A winery can also sell wine DTC, both at the winery and online, including through wine clubs. The state also offers two opportunities for the online retail sale of wine without a traditional brick and mortar store. The first of these is with a 17/20 wholesale and retail combination, or a 9/17/20 import/wholesale/retail combination. In both cases, wine can be sold online to customers and indeed can only be sold by direct mail, telephone or the internet from a location which is not open to the public. The license combination is often located right at the warehouse, enabling the licensee to easily pick and pack and ship out customer orders. The 17/20 combination allows the holder to sell directly to retailers as well as consumers and, with the addition of the type 9, the licensee can bring in wine from out-of-state and get it all the way to a consumer without passing through any other licensee’s hands. The second option is more recent and consists of a type 85 license, which gives the licensee the ability to sell wine at retail without the added wholesale or import rights. The chief distinction between the 85 and the 17/20 combination is that the 17/20 licensees have a wholesale license so they are required to make sales to retailers in addition to consumers, whereas the type 85 licensee sells only to consumers.

OUT-OF-STATE SELLERS: If you are a seller of alcohol located out-of-state, only wine can be sold DTC to California consumers and only under certain circumstances. A licensed winery in another U.S. state can get a direct shipper’s permit to sell DTC. For a licensed retailer in another state, the laws are murkier. California has a “reciprocity” statute which only permits out-of-state retail sales from states which allow a California retailer to ship to that state’s consumers. Currently, only thirteen states and the District of Columbia allow such sales. However, the concept of “reciprocity” was criticized by the Supreme Court in its 2005 decision in Granholm v. Heald, 544 U.S. 460, with specific reference to this California law. The law itself has not been challenged and thus the limitation remains on the books.

If you are interested in learning more about direct shipping laws in California or elsewhere, contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·


How About a Bacon Flavored Beer?

July 09, 2014

“Ready-to-drink” alcoholic beverage categories are continuing to boom. Variously known as flavored malt beverages (FMBs), alcopops, progressive adult beverages (PABs) and ready-to-drink cocktails (RTDs), all sorts of flavors are being added to all sorts of products to create new taste sensations. Despite RTDs generally suffering some decline after Four Loko triggered state bans on adding caffeine to alcoholic beverages (covered here, here, here, here, and here), the category has well and truly picked up again in recent times.

If you are looking to produce a flavored product, we have put some tips together to keep in mind.

Formulation Issues

One of the key things under federal law to be aware of with FMBs is that most of the alcohol must come from the malt beverage base. If the product is below 6% alcohol, at least half of the alcohol must come from the production of the beverage itself and cannot come from nonbeverage items like flavorings (which often contain high alcohol levels). Above 6%, no more than 1.5% of the alcohol can be from nonbeverage ingredients.

For wine-based products, an important factor to keep in mind is to make sure that your formula leaves you with a product that you can sell in grocery stores in states that do not allow them to sell wine. In New York, for example, a wine product that can be sold in grocery stores must meet a strict definition which includes that it must be below 6% alcohol, and it must contain juice and carbon dioxide. If you can meet the definition, you fall outside price posting requirements in the state, but you still have to register the brand there. Similarly, in a state like New York, you should be aware that a distilled spirits based RTD, even if below 6% or 7% alcohol, can’t be sold at grocery, convenience and pharmacy type stores where most low alcohol products are sold.

Labeling Issues

It is important to know about the various regulatory agencies that monitor the labeling of alcoholic beverages. FMBs and wine coolers, depending on their alcohol content, could fall under the regulation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), or both. For example, labeling requirements for wines containing 7% or more alcohol are controlled by the TTB, but wine coolers under 7% alcohol are regulated by the FDA, because such products do not fall under the federal definition of wine. In addition, labeling requirements for beers not made from malted barley and hops are regulated by the FDA (such as sorghum beer), while malt based products and distilled spirit based products are subject principally to TTB requirements.

If your product falls under TTB’s labeling jurisdiction, you will need to get a Certificate of Label Approval (COLA) and you will likely need to get formula approval (see, for example, our previous blog on easing up of beer formula requirements here). If your product label is FDA regulated, you will have to include a nutrition facts statement and other information that would not be required under the TTB labeling regulations. Bear in mind that even products under FDA jurisdiction for labeling still may need TTB formula approval. You need to be careful about using any type of name which makes customers think that the product might be a spirit drink if it isn’t (including cocktail names like margarita or daiquiri).

Recycling

In addition to formulation and labeling issues, recycling laws surrounding FMBs and similar products can be tricky. Ten states, including California (with its CalRecycle program), Connecticut, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Oregon, and Vermont, have container recycling laws that apply to a variety of alcoholic beverages. The specific products that are subject to the laws vary from state to state, as do the container marking requirements. Wine- and spirits-based products may be subject to recycling laws, even in states where wine and distilled spirits are exempted.

Conclusion

Before producing a flavored malt beverage or other ready to drink beverage, be sure to familiarize yourself with the special rules that apply to these products. For questions about any of these products, contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2014 · All Rights Reserved ·


Clarifications from the ABC on Sweepstakes and Contests in California

October 17, 2013

On June 13, 2013, guests attending ShipCompliant’s “Direct 2013” conference heard from Matthew Botting, General Counsel to the California ABC, on supplier participation in sweepstakes and contests under California’s new law. We’ve previously blogged about the new law here and here.

California Code of Regulations Title 4, Section 106 (“Rule 106”) has always allowed suppliers to “sponsor” a contest, meaning suppliers could give money or otherwise participate when the contest was organized by “bona fide amateur or professional organizations.” Previously, the privilege was limited. Now, the privileges are broader: suppliers (including wineries) can now “conduct” a contest under recently enacted Business and Professions Code Section 25600.1, and conduct or sponsor a sweepstakes under 25600.2. Mr. Botting discussed the different available privileges and their limitations:

* “Conduct” means the promotion is managed and organized by the supplier.
* “Sponsor” means it is someone else’s sweepstakes or contest and the supplier is providing a prize or other sponsorship of the promotion.
* For the time being, suppliers can only sponsor a contest in accordance with the existing Rule 106, which means sponsorship is limited to a contest conducted by bona fide amateur or professional organizations.
* Sponsoring a sweepstakes and conducting a sweepstakes or contest is now covered by Business and Professions Code Section 25600.1 and 25600.2. Sweepstakes or contests cannot require a visit to a licensed premises of any kind, so there must be an alternate method of entry (“AMOE”) if entry forms are available at a licensee.
* Sweepstakes and contests cannot be conducted on retail premises (e.g., a grocery store, liquor store, bar or restaurant). A “retail premise” includes some locations you might not think of, such as: an unlicensed premises if a licensed caterer is present, or at an event held by a nonprofit under a one-day permit. The ABC considers events held with a caterer’s license or a nonprofit one-day permit to occur “at the premises of a retail licensee,” and therefore a supplier may only provide a means of entry at either of these types of events.
* While suppliers may provide a means of entry for the contest or sweepstakes, the contest or sweepstakes may not be conducted at a winery or brewery’s duplicate tasting room.
* A contest or sweepstakes can only be advertised at a retailer if it is advertised at a minimum of three different retailers, and winners shouldn’t be picked at a licensed retail event nor in a tasting room.

The full presentation by Mr. Botting can be seen here (starting at the 5:00 minute mark).

Before conducting or sponsoring any contest or sweepstakes, be sure to consult the relevant laws, Business & Professions Code Sections 25600.1, 25600.2, and, if applicable, Rule 106 (regarding contests), and pay particular attention to whether the supplier involved holds a license that allows it to participate.

Contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have questions about contests and sweepstakes in California or other states.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·


California On Sale General Public Premises (Type 48) Licensees Must Post Human Trafficking Notificat

September 24, 2013

To raise awareness and provide resources to potential victims of human trafficking, California Civil Code Section 52.6 now mandates that, as of April 1, 2013, all On Sale General Public Premises (Type 48) retail licensees, along with certain other types of businesses, must post a notice about human trafficking. The United States Department of State estimates that 14,500-17,500 victims are trafficked into the United States each year, with California as one of the country’s top four destination states.

The notice must be posted in a conspicuous place (near the public entrance or in clear view of the public and employees), measure at least 8.5 inches by 11 inches, and the following message must appear in at least size 16 font:

“If you or someone you know is being forced to engage in any activity and cannot leave—whether it is commercial sex, housework, farm work, construction, factory, retail, or restaurant work, or any other activity—call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-373-7888 or the California Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST) at 1-888-KEY-2-FRE(EDOM) or 1-888-539-2373 to access help and services. Victims of slavery and human trafficking are protected under United States and California law.

The hotlines are:

Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Toll-free.
Operated by nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations.
Anonymous and confidential.
Accessible in more than 160 languages.
Able to provide help, referral to services, training, and general information.”

This notice must be in English and Spanish, and a model notice is available here. Depending on the county, the notice may also be required in another language. A list of those counties is available here.

For more information on this posting requirement, call the Victim Services Unit at the California Attorney General’s Office toll free: (877) 433-9069.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·


San Francisco Type 47s

August 27, 2012

A Type 47 license is for an On-Sale General for Bona Fide Public Eating Place. It allows the sale of all kinds of alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, distilled spirits) at a place that serves food to the public. These licenses, like others in San Francisco, are extremely difficult to acquire. The California Alcoholic Beverage Control Act (ABC) limits the number of on-sale general liquor licenses that can be issued to one for each 2,000, or fraction thereof, of inhabitants of the county in which the licensed establishment is situated (see Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 23816). If there is already one on-sale general license issued for each 2,000 people in a county, then no new licenses can be issued. Licenses that already exist can, however, be transferred to new locations.

Once a year the ABC announces counties where new on-sale liquor licenses will be issued, but because of the density of alcoholic beverage licenses in San Francisco county new licenses haven’t been allowed for years and may never be allowed again unless the population density of the county greatly increases. Earlier this month, the ABC announced new liquor license authorizations for counties where the population density has increased (you can read the ABC’s announcement here). These new applications, along with the ability to apply for priority applications to transfer on-sale general and off-sale general licenses between counties, will be accepted by the ABC from September 10th through 21st. Unfortunately, if you’re looking to start a restaurant in San Francisco you’re stuck buying a license on the open market, which can be difficult given their rarity and expense (typically six figures). If you have questions about opening a business that sells alcoholic beverages in San Francisco, please feel free to contact any of the Strike & Techel attorneys.


Deceptive Retail Discounts: How Much is that Wine Really Discounted?

June 26, 2012

Among the brouhaha surrounding JCPenney these days is a proposed class action complaint that was recently filed in the Central District of California. In the complaint, the plaintiff alleges that she purchased items from JCPenney because the items were advertised as being on sale, but the prices were inaccurately advertised as discounted because the “original” price advertised was not the prevailing market retail price for the goods. As in many states, false and misleading claims in advertising are prohibited in California. See Cal. Bus & Prof. Code §§ 17500, 17508(a). California consumer protection law further state that:

No price shall be advertised as a former price of any advertised thing, unless the alleged former price was the prevailing market price as above defined within three months next immediately preceding the publication of the advertisement or unless the date when the alleged former price did prevail is clearly, exactly and conspicuously stated in the advertisement. Cal. Bus & Prof. Code § 17501.

Here the plaintiff asserts that the “original” prices, to which she compared the “sale” prices in order to make her decision to purchase numerous items, weren’t the prevailing market prices for the items at JCPenney for the three months immediately preceding the advertisement.

Pricing has become more difficult in this day and age of the “bargain.” Many people have come to expect an item to be always on sale or for there to always be some way to buy an item for less than what others are paying. While the pressures this creates on retailers are often great, retail prices cannot be amorphous. Advertising false “sale” prices could lead to lawsuits like the one filed against JCPenney. The Federal Trade Commission offers guidance about proper advertisements on its website, which can be found here. Regarding deceptive pricing, the FTC offers the following:

One of the most commonly used forms of bargain advertising is to offer a reduction from the advertiser’s own former price for an article. If the former price is the actual, bona fide price at which the article was offered to the public on a regular basis for a reasonably substantial period of time, it provides a legitimate basis for the advertising of a price comparison. Where the former price is genuine, the bargain being advertised is a true one. If, on the other hand, the former price being advertised is not bona fide but fictitious—for example, where an artificial, inflated price was established for the purpose of enabling the subsequent offer of a large reduction—the ``bargain’’ being advertised is a false one; the purchaser is not receiving the unusual value he expects. 16 C.F.R. § 233.1.

It’s hard to be a consumer goods retailer in any industry these days, but the wine industry in particular has seen substantial changes in consumer pricing expectations given the economic situation over the last few years. While trying to meet this consumer demand, it’s important to remember that when creating pricing structures, there’s a fine line between providing value and creating false value.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2012 · All Rights Reserved ·


What Can I Do With the Type 85 ABC License?

April 20, 2012

We’ve been getting lots of inquiries about the privileges and limitations of the new limited off-sale license offered by the ABC. Though we’ve already commented on the basics of the permit here, we’re following up with answers to the clarification questions we’ve been getting:

Where can I find the privileges for the new off-sale wine license?

Read the ABC Advisory and the enabling statute CAL. BUS. & PROF. CODE §23393.5.

Can I sell tequila and beer with the Type 85?

No, the privilege is limited to wine.

Can I get the Type 85 license if I have an upper-tier California license?

No. The Type 85 is a retail-tier license, and there are no special exceptions permitting it to be held with an upper-tier license. On the flip side, you can get it if you are an employee of an on-sale retailer. This is a key distinction between the Type 85 and the Type 17/20 combination that remains popular in California.

Can I deliver product stored out-of-state directly to consumers in California with the Type 85?

No. You must have possession and title to the wine in California. It must be delivered to the consumer from your licensed premises in California or the premises of a licensed public warehouse (Type 14 License).

Can I deliver wine to consumers outside of California with the Type 85?

Yes, but only to about 13 states. 2/3 of those states require additional licensing. You can’t reach New York, Texas, Illinois or Florida.

Do I have to have a location to obtain the Type 85?

Yes. You have to choose an address where the license will be active and your records will be kept. It may not be open to the public. You will have to post notice at the premises and mail notice to nearby neighbors.

Who can I buy wine from with the Type 85?

Licensed California wholesalers and wineries. Not retailers.

How do I apply for the Type 85?

If you are interested in obtaining the license, you need to fill out the forms for an original retail license (e.g. ABC 211-SIG, 217, 208-A/B, 253, 257, 255, 247, 251, 140, entity forms). You can obtain them from the ABC website, or can hire an attorney or licensing specialist to complete them and assist you with the process. The filing fee is $342 ($100 application fee plus $242 annual fee).

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2012 · All Rights Reserved ·


California Industry Advisory on Third Party Providers: The Rise of the Escrow Account

November 16, 2011

The California ABC released an Advisory earlier this month that outlines a compliant path for California alcoholic beverage licensees to engage unlicensed service providers. In our practice, this issue comes up often in reference to websites that look like wine shops, but hold no alcoholic beverage licenses of their own. The Advisory is available here.

We were active on the working group that made suggestions on this issue to the ABC, and were pleased that the ABC was willing to listen to industry feedback before deciding on a course of action. We’ve been getting lots of questions on the provision regarding control of funds, which (is long!) and states:

“The control of funds from a transaction involving the sale of alcoholic beverages constitutes a significant degree of control over a licensed business. As such, while a Third Party provider may act as an agent for the collection of funds (such as receiving credit card information and securing payment authorization), the full amount collected must be handled in a manner that gives the licensee control over the ultimate distribution of funds. This means that the Third Party Provider cannot independently collect the funds, retain its fee, and pass the balance on to the licensee. The Third Party Provider should pass all funds collected from the consumer to the licensee conducting the sale, and that licensee should thereafter pay the Third Party Provider for services rendered. Alternatively, the parties may utilize an escrow account, or similar instrument, that disburses the funds upon the instructions of the licensee. So, for example, a Third Party Provider may accept consumer credit card information, debit the card, deposit the funds in an account under the licensee’s ultimate control, and, upon the licensee’s acceptance of the order and direction to the account holder, receive a fee from the account. Given the nature of Internet transactions, the Department recognizes that such collection, acceptance, and disbursement of funds will often times be accomplished solely through computer-generated means.”

We’re looking forward to seeing how the industry adapts to this provision, which seems to require that all funds for an alcoholic beverage sale settle to the account of a licensee before they are disbursed. Will new “alcohol escrow” businesses pop-up to service the need? Will each unlicensed website create its own special accounting to comply? Will fee collection be adversely affected for the unlicensed websites, such that the business model becomes less viable? We’re watching this issue unfold with great anticipation.


New Limited Off-Sale Retail Wine Licenses in California

October 19, 2011

Beginning January 1, 2012, a new license will be available for direct-to-consumer wine sales. The new license is the result of approval of Assembly Bill No. 623, which revises California’s Business and Professions code to add Section 23393.5 authorizing the license. Sales may only be made to consumers. All sales must occur through direct mail, telephone or Internet; they may not be conducted from a location that is open to the public. The licensee must take possession and title to all wine sold. All wine must be delivered to the consumer from the licensee’s premises or a licensed public warehouse. The application and annual fee are the same as those applicable to a Type 20 off-sale beer and wine license. The key differences between the new limited off-sale retail license and a type 20 license are that the type 20 requires a brick and mortar store that is open to the public and a type 20 license also allows the sale of beer for consumption away from the licensed premises. If you would like more information about the license, please feel free to contact any of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.


California ABC Announces New License Authorizations

September 01, 2011

Priority application season is upon us, beginning September 12th. ABC Headquarters recently announced the authorization for the issuance of new on-sale general and off-sale general licenses in certain counties. What this means: General licenses authorize the sale of beer, wine and distilled spirits. They are restricted based upon county population. If your county is already at its maximum, you can’t get a new general license from the ABC and instead must buy one from an existing licensee in your county, typically at a significant premium. However, in counties where growth has occurred, the ABC permits new general licenses within the county once per year during a ‘priority’ application period by allowing both new issuances of licenses in the county and intercounty transfers of licenses. An intercounty transfer means a business owner in the priority county can buy a general license on the open market anywhere in the state and transfer it in to the priority county. A person can apply for one of the priority general license spots in the county, or for one of the priority intercounty general license transfer spots, or for both. Anyone that anticipates the need for an Off-Sale General Package Store License (Type 21), an On-Sale General Eating Place Restaurant License (Type 47), or a Special On-Sale General Club License (Type 57) within the next year in a county with licenses available should apply. Licenses Available by County: For a complete listing of licenses available by county, click here. 2011 Filing Period: ABC District Offices will accept in-person or mail-in priority applications from September 12-23, 2011. Mail-in applications must be postmarked September 23 or earlier in order to be accepted. If the Department receives more applications than licenses available (which it will), a public drawing is held. Applicants are typically notified two weeks later of their priority status. Once approved for priority, the applicant has 90 days to complete the full formal license application for the identified premises. Fees: Priority application fees are $13,800 for new general licenses and $6,000 for intercounty transfers. Only a certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be accepted, and it must be submitted with the priority application. Unsuccessful applicants’ fees will be refunded, less a $100 service charge, within 45 days of the drawing. Residency requirements: Every applicant must be a resident of California for at least 90 days prior to the drawing. The 90 day clock starts ticking upon registration with the CA Secretary of State for corporations, limited partnerships, and limited liability companies. Individuals and partners must submit proof of California residency. If you are interested in applying for a new on or off-sale general priority license, please feel free to contact the attorneys at Strike & Techel. Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2011 · All Rights Reserved ·


New Law on California Beer Tasting Rooms

August 11, 2011

California beer fans are sure to toast the passage of AB1014, which Governor Jerry Brown signed into law on August 1st. The bill, presented by Assemblymen Fletcher (R) and Chesbro (D), amends California’s Health and Safety Code to exempt beer manufacturers’ beer tasting areas from the strict health and sanitation codes applied to food service locations. Beer manufacturers include those holding a beer manufacturer’s license, an out-of-state beer manufacturer’s certificate, or a beer and wine importer’s general license. Wine tasting rooms have been exempt from such provisions for years. The health and sanitation codes are lengthy and expensive to comply with; thus, compliance costs typically outweighed the benefit of a beer tasting room for many brewers, especially small craft operations. Compliance with the new exemption requires that the only foods served on the premises are crackers and pretzels. Additionally, only beer and “prepackaged nonpotentially hazardous beverages” may be offered. A copy of the revised Section 113789 of California’s Health and Safety code is available here.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2010-2011 · All Rights Reserved ·


No More Alcopops in California

August 03, 2011

On Monday Governor Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 39 banning the production, importation, and sale of beer to which caffeine as a separate ingredient has been directly added. Senator Alex Padilla, a Democrat from the San Fernando Valley, introduced the Bill last December. In order to enforce the prohibition, licensees may be required by the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to provide product formulas. All formulas provided will be considered confidential trade secrets and not subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act. The new law can be found in Section 25622 of California’s Business and Professions Code. The law does not prohibit beers where caffeine is a part of the brewing process itself, such as a coffee porter. It is aimed instead at the Progressive Adult Beverages (PABs) (also commonly referred to as Ready to Drinks (RTDs) and Flavored Alcoholic Beverages (FABs)) that have been in the news since last fall. See our prior coverage here, here, here, and here. This puts California in line with states like New York, Massachusetts, Washington, Michigan, Kansas, and Utah, which have also banned such beverages.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2010-2011 · All Rights Reserved ·


California’s New Online Sales Tax Law Could Impact California Wine Purchases

July 01, 2011

Earlier this week, California legislators passed a law that requires large internet retailers to collect sales tax for orders placed from California customers. Most of the publicity surrounding the bill has been on large internet retailers like Amazon.com and Overstock.com, which have strongly opposed the law, and are now beginning the process of limiting their presence in California in order to avoid needing to charge sales tax on California purchases. However, the law is not limited to these major retailers, as it stands to affect consumers who order alcohol online as well as out-of-state alcohol retailers who do substantial business in the state.

Two primary factors will most impact whether an alcohol retailer and its consumers will be affected by the new law. First, the law is aimed at large retailers, and only applies only to businesses that have sales within California in excess of $500,000 over the previous 12 months. This likely means that orders from small wineries would remain untaxed, while large internet retailers will probably need to start charging sales tax to California consumers.

Second, the law applies only to retailers that have a “substantial nexus” in California. The precise meaning of this term has already been the source of considerable confusion, and large retailers like Amazon.com have begun breaking ties with California-based affiliates and entities that provide “click-throughs” to their site, so that they are not affected by the law. How this provision affects out-of-state alcohol retailers remains unclear. Retailers that are definitely subject to the law are those with a place of business in California, including an office, place of distribution, sales room, or warehouse. Also, retailers with representatives or salespeople in California will be subject to the law. What remains unknown is whether retailers without any such contacts will be required to collect sales tax on shipments into the state. Stay tuned.

California’s new law went into effect on July 1, 2011, and is codified at Cal. Rev. & Tax Code § 6203.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2010-2011 · All Rights Reserved ·


When Wine is Not Wine for California Tax Purposes

April 14, 2011

Although it has not been extensively covered in the media, those involved in the manufacture and importation of certain wine products should be aware of the California Board of Equalization’s (“BOE”) proposed Regulation 2558.1, involving the definition of “wine” for excise tax purposes in California. The regulation should not affect typical wine producers; however, those that create alternative wine products where a portion of the alcohol within the product is derived from, for example, apples or malt grains, instead of grapes, but the product is marketed as a typical grape wine product, should be aware of the proposed Regulation. Enactment of the Regulation essentially means that a sangria product that is classified as “wine” by the ABC could be classified as a distilled spirit by the BOE, and thus be taxed at $3.30/gallon (the rate for distilled spirits that are 100 proof or less) as opposed to the $0.20/gallon rate applied to wine. That constitutes a tax increase of 1650%. The proposed Regulation would define “wine” for BOE purposes as products that do not include more than .5% alcohol by volume derived from the distillation of fermented agricultural products other than the main agricultural product from which the wine is made. This is different that the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control’s (“ABC”) definition, which defines wine as:

…the product obtained from normal alcoholic fermentation of the juice of sound ripe grapes or other agricultural products containing natural or added sugar or any such alcoholic beverage to which is added grape brandy, fruit brandy, or spirits of wine, which is distilled from the particular agricultural product or products of which the wine is made and other rectified wine products and by whatever name and which does not contain more than 15 percent added flavoring, coloring, and blending material and which contains not more than 24 percent of alcohol by volume, and includes vermouth and sake, known as Japanese rice wine.

Essentially the ABC’s definition looks at wine as a product to which only a certain amount (15%) of “other” material can be added, while the BOE’s definition is based on a requirement that 95.5% of the alcohol in the product be derived from a single commodity. The process of this change began at the BOE’s November 17, 2010 meeting, wherein it authorized an informal rulemaking process and proceeded on an expedited basis. On December 17, 2010, after preparing an initial draft of the proposed change, an interested parties meeting was held. During the meeting, it became clear to the staff that there was an industry divergence regarding what constituted legitimate “blending material” under the ABC’s definition and what should be included under the BOE’s definition. Thus, the BOE decided that further interested party meetings would not be useful and they settled on a BOE definition that did not derive from the blending viewpoint, but rather from the alcohol derivation viewpoint. On February 23, 2011, the final proposed regulation was issued. A 45-day comment period then began and the next step is a public hearing in front of the BOE in May 2011. The proposed Regulation is scheduled to go into effect on January 1, 2012.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2010-2011 · All Rights Reserved ·


SF ABC Stops Accepting Walk-in Applications

April 05, 2011

The SF office of the California Alcoholic Beverage Control informed us today that they are no longer accepting walk-in applications. This means that you must call the SF ABC to make a filing appointment and then mail-in your application. Be sure to plan ahead for the additional time this may take.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2010-2011 · All Rights Reserved ·


Pay Close Attention: H.R. 5034

June 21, 2010

House Bill 5034 has been making the news since its introduction in mid-April. If you are in the business of alcoholic beverages, you need to be watching this bill. It could be a game changer.

The bill is referred to as the CARE Act, which is short for Comprehensive Alcohol Regulatory Effectiveness Act of 2010. If passed, the bill will strengthen state control over alcoholic beverage regulation by making it nearly impossible to challenge state alcoholic beverage laws, even if there is a conflicting federal law.

Though it is a short bill, it has three very significant elements:

1) State laws are presumed valid

2) Any person challenging a state law has the burden of proving the invalidity of the state law by clear and convincing evidence in all phases of the legal action

3) The state law will be upheld unless the challenging party proves the law has no effect on:

  1. The promotion of temperance
  2. The establishment and maintenance of orderly alcoholic beverage markets
  3. The collection of alcoholic beverage taxes
  4. The structure of the state alcoholic beverage distribution system
  5. The restriction of access to alcoholic beverages by those under the legal drinking age

You can track the bill by entering HR 5034 under “bill number” here: http://thomas.loc.gov/

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice.


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