Category archives for “ABC Enforcement”

Suppliers Now Allowed to Use Social Media to Support Certain Charity Events Sponsored by Retailers

February 17, 2016

Effective January 1, 2016, the California ABC Act contains a new section that loosens the restrictions suppliers face when mentioning a retailer in a social media post. Newly added Business and Professions Code § 23355.3 is aimed at clarifying how suppliers and retailers can co-sponsor nonprofit events. It was drafted, in part, as a response to the backlash that occurred after the ABC filed accusations against several wineries for advertising sponsorship of the “Save Mart Grape Escape” charity fundraising event in 2014. In that instance, several wineries posted or tweeted their support and sponsorship of the event on social media. The ABC reasoned that the suppliers were impermissibly advertising for Save Mart, a retailer, even though the event was held under a nonprofit permit issued to a bona fide nonprofit organization. The ABC alleged that by posting or tweeting about the event, the suppliers were giving a thing of value to the retailer, a practice that has long been considered a violation of California’s tied house restrictions.

California law has long permitted supplier licensees to sponsor nonprofit events if the nonprofit gets an event license, and the new law does not fundamentally change that. However, the new section clarifies that a supplier may advertise sponsorship or participation in such events even if a retailer is also a named sponsor of the event. Payments or other consideration to the retailer are still considered a thing of value, and are not allowed, but social media postings no longer fall under that broad category. There are restrictions on what the supplier is permitted to post about the retailer; posts cannot contain the retail price of alcoholic beverages and cannot promote or advertise for the retail licensee beyond mentioning sponsorship or participation in the event. The supplier can share a retailer’s advertisement for the event on social media, but the supplier is not permitted to pay or reimburse the retailer for any advertisement and cannot demand exclusivity of its products at the event. In short, the new section will allow exactly the type of supplier social media support that occurred in the Save Mart Grape Escape situation.


New California Law Creates License for Craft Distilleries, Updates Spirits Tasting Rules

October 13, 2015

On October 8, 2015, California Governor Brown signed the Craft Distilleries Act of 2015 into law, which creates a new license for craft distilleries. AB 1295 is a step forward for craft spirits producers, who will no longer be subject to the same strict restrictions that apply to traditional Distilled Spirits Manufacturers (Type 4 licensees). The new Craft Distiller’s license allows the production of up to 100,000 gallons of distilled spirits each year and also includes several other key privileges not available to larger distilleries that hold Type 4 licenses: Craft Distillers will be able to sell distilled spirits to consumers, operate restaurants from their premises, and hold interests in on-sale retail licenses.

AB 1295 adds several sections to the California Alcoholic Beverage Control Act, including Business and Professions Code Sections 23500 through 23508. Those sections include the following privileges for Craft Distillers:

  • Manufacture of up to 100,000 gallons of distilled spirits each fiscal year (July 1 – June 30), excluding any brandy the licensee may have produced under a Brandy Manufacturer license. Licensees can also package, rectify, mix, flavor, color, label, and export distilled spirits manufactured by the licensee.
  • Sale of up to 2.25 liters of its distilled spirits per consumer, per day, in conjunction with instructional tastings held on its licensed premises.
  • Operation of a bona fide eating place on its licensed premises or a location contiguous to its premises, from which the licensee may sell beer, wine, and distilled spirits.
  • May hold an interest in up to two California on-sale licenses, provided certain conditions are met.
  • Cannot be issued to anyone who manufactures or has manufactured for him over 100,000 gallons of distilled spirits, whether inside or outside California, excluding any brandy the licensee may have produced under a Brandy Manufacturer license.

The new bill also amends Business and Professions Code Section 23363.1 to allow Craft Distillers to conduct distilled spirits tastings either: a) off their licensed premises at a nonprofit event held under a nonprofit permit; or, b) at their licensed premises under specific conditions. The other notable change to the statute is that tastings can be provided in the form of a cocktail or mixed drink, and the sample size limitation has been changed to one and one-half ounces maximum per consumer per day. Those changes apply to both Craft Distillers and Distilled Spirits Manufacturers.

The new laws take effect January 1, 2016.

Contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have any questions about distillery licenses in California or elsewhere.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2015 • All Rights Reserved •


New California ABC Advisory on Merchandising Services by Suppliers

January 07, 2015

In December 2014, the California ABC posted a new Industry Advisory about merchandising services. Free services provided by suppliers to retail licensees, such as stocking shelves, pricing inventory, rotating stock, etc., are prohibited things-of-value under California Business & Professions Code sections 25500 and 25502. However, a number of permitted exceptions are separately provided for in Section 25503.2. The Advisory was posted in response to inquiries and complaints about the scope of permissible activity. When ABC receives multiple complaints about impermissible conduct, investigations and license accusations may well follow, so it would be prudent for suppliers to review the scope of permissible merchandising activities.

Permitted activity varies depending on the type of retailer and the products involved so we created a simple chart below to help keep it straight.

Note that in all cases, any merchandising activities can only be done with the retailer’s permission. In no case can a supplier move the inventory of another supplier, except for “incidental touching” to access the space allocated to the licensee providing the merchandising service.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2015 · All Rights Reserved ·


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